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Technology

Technology (103)

Before you buy that e-reader as a Chistmas or Hannukah present, read this.

he business card has long since left the realm of the office Rolodex and entered the world of the Web.

Yesterday, we got a rare look at how information on your public social media profiles—including Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn—is being harvested and resold by large consumer data companies.

Reflecting the Obama legacy and US culture, the Time columnist says: "the bottom line is: 'whose 4-year-olds get killed?'"

In the wake of its IPO debacle, expect Facebook to leverage its market dominance aggressively – with its billion users hostage

Tuesday, 02 October 2012 16:17

Inside the Obama Campaign's Hard Drive

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Obama's tech guru and his microtargeting whiz kids are building a new kind of Chicago machine. Can they help the president hold on to the Oval Office?

Tuesday, 25 September 2012 14:03

Drones: The West's New Terror Campaign

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Living Under Drones, a new report from Stanford and New York universities, was a difficult piece of fieldwork – I was with the law students in Peshawar as they tried to interview victims of the CIA's drone war. But it has made an important contribution to the drone debate by identifying the innocent victims of the CIA's reign of terror: the entire civilian population of Waziristan (roughly 800,000 people).

Wednesday, 12 September 2012 23:39

Social Networks Can Affect Voter Turnout, Study Says

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A study of millions of Facebook users on Election Day 2010 has found that online social networks can have a measurable if limited effect on voter turnout.

Thursday, 06 September 2012 21:59

Apple, Drone Strikes, and the Limits of Censorship

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Wired reported last week that the Apple App Store has rejected an app that compiles news reports in order to map overseas U.S. drone strikes, and provide users a pop-up notification whenever a drone strike has been reported.

Is law enforcement tracking your cell phone's GPS more like intercepting a phone call or tailing someone on the street? A federal court decision says it's more like following you—which means the authorities don't need to get a warrant to find out where you are at any given time.

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